Posts tagged "wax family printing"

Communication Is Not the Problem

January 19th, 2018 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Communication Is Not the Problem”

What did you say?

Whenever there seems to be a lack of communication around the office, it might just be a symptom of something else. When people start complaining about no communication, more often something has gone wrong, or people feel that they didn’t have enough information to be successful. “No one said anything.”

The failure to have everyone on the same wavelength is not a true communication issue, but a lack of proper systems or operating procedures. When employees are unclear in their job descriptions or on what they can and cannot do, things slip through the cracks and “communication” gets the blame.

Don’t just call a meeting!

“Let’s all get on the same page” is a common reaction to misunderstanding the problem. If this sounds like what’s happening in your business, don’t send more emails and calendar invites. Instead, take a look at your operating procedures and employee onboarding processes. You may find the missing link right there. Having clear procedures and good employee training about those procedures goes a long way to preventing people from feeling like they’re not getting the information they need to make decisions. It also helps ensure that when steps are missed, the rest of the team can recognize the error before it gets out of control.

If it’s time to improve your employee training manuals, our team of experts can help you design, write and then publish exactly what your team needs. Call us at (615) 893-4290 or email info@waxfamilyprinting.com.

Stop Doing That – And Get Growing

December 22nd, 2017 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Stop Doing That – And Get Growing”

In a previous blog post, I quoted Bob Newhart, “Stop it!” Sometimes we need to realize what we are doing and adjust some behaviors.

For small-business start-ups, it can be hard to imagine growth when you don’t have time to get everything done. It’s also hard to imagine taking on the expense of people to do the tedious things that eat up your day.

Growth can only happen if the vision of the company can be realized in the day-to- day operations. When all of the decision making and task completing fall to one person, chances are that sales will stagnate.

If you want to grow, it is wise to hire people to do the tasks you don’t want to do or are not very good at doing. The executive director of Homeward Animal Shelter took a year to convince the board to let her hire a full-time marketing person. This freed her and her staff to raise more money, care for more animals, and forward their mission.

Prosthetics, a 3-D printing company focused on printing inexpensive prosthetics for children, was founded by college engineering seniors who gained a wide following through social media. After two years, they realized they weren’t very good at sales. They brought on a sales director, which allowed the founders to do what they do best.

A great idea and a lot of passion can only take you so far. Surrounding yourself with competent people that understand the mission and vision of your company may provide the right catalyst for growth and success.

Tips

» If you don’t have the budget to hire a new employee, start with a consultant or service company to take those duties. Wax Eloquent can operate as your marketing department.

» Think about how to increase productivity when adding staff or consultants. The goal is to grow your business. The new hires must free up time for moneymaking efforts.

Working Together: Size Up The Crowd

December 8th, 2017 Posted by Uncategorized 0 comments on “Working Together: Size Up The Crowd”

Meetings get a bad rap. Ask a coworker to attend a meeting; sometimes you will see their shoulders droop. What gives?

As it turns out, meetings aren’t the problem. We are. Most of us don’t really know what a meeting is. Why are we gathering 20 people in a room just to listen to one or two managers talk and then calling it a meeting? It’s time to redefine our terminology. Meeting: a small gathering whose purpose is to solve a problem in a short time frame.

Presentation: all other “meetings”…

Warning signs that your “meeting” may not be a meeting:
1. People stop speaking up
2. Not everyone talks
3. More than seven people
4. It takes more than 20 minutes
5. One or two people “run” it

Signs you’re in a true meeting:
1. Everyone knows the exact purpose or goal
2. Only a handful of people present
3. Everyone contributes
4. It is over in less than 30 minutes
5. You end with a clear directive

If all meetings would follow the “true meeting” formula and the other kinds of gatherings were called what they are — presentations or training events — meetings would stop getting such a bad rap. Managing expectations is a key to happier employees, and fewer “meetings” always sounds good.